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Ontario Perception of Care Survey Results for Fall / Winter 2016 – CMHA Toronto

August 11, 2017

WHAT IS ONTARIO PERCEPTION OF CARE AND WHAT DOES IT MEASURE?

The Ontario Perception of Care Tool (OPOC) is a tool by which clients and families can provide confidential feedback on their perception of the kind of care they receive. This survey is being used across the Province of Ontario by many mental health and addictions agencies so that they can improve services, observe trends in their community, and respond more effectively to the needs of the people they serve.

At CMHA Toronto we are committed to quality improvement, so we provided a weblink and a code to individuals who had expressed an interest in participating in the OPOC survey, which was conducted between October – December 2016.

We are pleased to report the following:

  • 22 CMHA Toronto teams participated in the survey
  • 460 surveys were completed and entered into the OPOC database (428 Client, 32 Family)
  • CMHA Toronto had a higher than average response rate, receiving 9% of all responses received province wide
  • Our areas of excellence were:
    • Therapist / Staff / Worker
    • Client participation, rights and protection of privacy
    • Access to services

The ratings were based on a scale of 1 (strongly disagree) to 4 (strongly agree)

CMHA Toronto Average Scores Provincial Average Scores
Perception of Care: 3.46 out of 4 3.34 out of 4
Access to Services: 3.45 out of 4 3.37 out of 4
Experience with Services: 3.55 out of 4 3.46 out of 4

 

We are pleased with these results, but will continue to work on improving our services, particularly in the following identified areas:

  • How to make a formal complaint
  • Creating a plan and linkages to other services when clients are discharged from CMHA Toronto

Click Here for our overall client experience as reflected in the OPOC Surveys, which we encourage you to share these results with your clients, colleagues and community partners.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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